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Which item would be considered a secondary source?

Examples of Secondary Sources: Textbooks, edited works, books and articles that interpret or review research works, histories, biographies, literary criticism and interpretation, reviews of law and legislation, political analyses and commentaries.

What are secondary historical sources?

In contrast, a secondary source of information is one that was created later by someone who did not experience first-hand or participate in the events or conditions you’re researching. For the purposes of a historical research project, secondary sources are generally scholarly books and articles.

What is a secondary source for World War 2?

Secondary sources are generally a second-hand account or observation at least one step removed from the event.

What is the main distinction between primary and secondary?

Primary sources are the raw materials of historical research – they are the documents or artifacts closest to the topic of investigation. Secondary sources are not evidence, but rather commentary on and discussion of evidence. Note: The definition of a secondary source may vary depending upon the discipline or context.

How do you find the source of a literature review?

Where to search when doing a literature review

  1. Start with research databases. Scopus and Web of Science are good databases to start with for any research topic and literature review.
  2. Focus your search with specific databases. Select two or three discipline/specialist databases to conduct your search for comprehensive results.
  3. Find books, theses and more.

What is the difference between literature review and secondary research?

The literature review is the detailed summary of previous study that was conducted on a given topic whereas secondary research is the use of already existing data as a method or inquiry.

Ten Simple Rules for Writing a Literature Review

  • Rule 1: Define a Topic and Audience.
  • Rule 2: Search and Re-search the Literature.
  • Rule 3: Take Notes While Reading.
  • Rule 4: Choose the Type of Review You Wish to Write.
  • Rule 5: Keep the Review Focused, but Make It of Broad Interest.
  • Rule 6: Be Critical and Consistent.
  • Rule 7: Find a Logical Structure.