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Which has been the most help in breaking the cycle of poverty and disease in Botswana quizlet?

Which has been the most help in breaking the cycle of poverty and disease in Botswana? treatment, prevention, and testing. they live on less than two dollars a day according to the UN. decreasing and life expectancy is increasing.

What problems in a country could cause poverty to spiral out of control check all that apply?

low foreign debt. farm land destroyed by war. overabundance of exports. government corruption.

When a disease spreads rapidly over a large area or the world it is?

An epidemic is a disease that spreads rapidly among many people in a community at the same time. In the 1980s, the fast-spreading AIDS epidemic transformed life on our planet.

What has been the most help in breaking the cycle of poverty and disease in Botswana?

Programs to fight HIV/AIDS have been the most help in breaking the cycle of poverty and disease in Botswana.

Why did swine flu spread so quickly?

“Swine flu” pandemic 2009 to 2010 It spread rapidly from country to country because it was a new type of flu virus that few young people were immune to. Overall, the outbreak was not as serious as originally predicted, largely because many older people were already immune to it.

Is H1N1 still around?

In 2009, H1N1 was spreading fast around the world, so the World Health Organization called it a pandemic. Since then, people have continued to get sick from swine flu, but not as many. While swine flu isn’t as scary as it seemed a few years ago, it’s still important to protect yourself from getting it.

Is there a vaccine for H1N1 virus?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the use of one dose of vaccine against 2009 H1N1 influenza virus for persons 10 years of age and older. For children who are 6 months through 9 years of age, two doses of the vaccine are recommended. These two doses should be separated by 4 weeks.

Does Spanish flu still exist today?

Descendants of the 1918 H1N1 virus make up the influenza viruses we’re fighting today. “The 1918 flu is still with us, in that sense,” said Ann Reid, the executive director of the National Center for Science Education who successfully sequenced the genetic makeup of the 1918 influenza virus in the 1990s.