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Which countries were part of Austro-Hungarian Empire?

The former Austro-Hungarian Empire was spread over a large part of Central Europe, it comprises present Austria and Hungary as well as the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Bosnia, Croatia and parts of present Poland, Romania, Italy, Ukraine, Moldova, Serbia and Montenegro.

What was Austria-Hungary divided into?

1914-1918: Austria-Hungary defeated in First World War, split into separate entities based on nationality: Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia created; Galicia goes to Poland; Transylvania goes to Romania.

Why was Austria-Hungary divided?

The dissolution of Austria-Hungary was a major geopolitical event that occurred as a result of the growth of internal social contradictions and the separation of different parts of Austria-Hungary. The reason for the collapse of the state was World War I, the 1918 crop failure and the economic crisis.

Who was apart of the Austrian empire?

By this act, the Kingdom of Hungary and the Empire of Austria as two separate entities joined together on an equal basis to form the Dual Monarchy of Austria-Hungary.

What was the main religion in Austria?

Catholicism

What is Austria most known for?

Austria is famous for its castles, palaces and buildings, among other architectural works. Some of Austria’s most famous castles include Festung Hohensalzburg, Burg Hohenwerfen, Castle Liechtenstein, and the SchloƟ Artstetten. Many of Austria’s castles were created during the Habsburg reign.

What year did Christianity come to Finland?

13th century

When did Christianity start in Finland?

11th century

How did Christianity get to Finland?

The Swedes brought Christianity to Finland in the form of Roman Catholicism between 1050 or 1150 and 1300. Along with religion, the Swedes also established administration in southwestern Finland, from which it spread north and east. The Lutheran religion became the kingdom’s official state church in 1611.

Do Finnish people believe in God?

Only 27 per cent of Finns continue to believe in the God of Christianity, and the percentage of believers has fallen by 10 per cent in only four years. Those who believe in God are few in number, considering that 77 per cent of Finns are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland.